Scientific Program

Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Experts Meeting on Parkinsons and Movement Disorders Paris, France.

Day 1 :

  • Advanced therapies in Parkinson’s Disease

Session Introduction

Ashok Chakraborty

Research Scientist at Yale University, United States

Title: Parkinson’s Disease (PD): Allogeneic Cell Replacement Therapeutic Approach with a Novel Neural Cell line
Biography:

Dr. Chakraborty is a Retired Faculty Reearch Scientist from Yale, and presently working at AllExcel as CSO. Dr. Anil Diwan is a Ph.D. Biotechnology and a Chemical engineer. He is the CEO and President of the Company, Allexcel.

 

Abstract:

Parkinson’s disease is caused by the progressive impairment or deterioration of neurons (nerve cells) in an area of the brain known as Substantia Nigra.

OBJECTIVE: 

  • Curative therapy for Parkinson’s Disease
  • Current therapies are based on dopamine supplementation in the brain. They are only palliative, and require adjunct therapies to minimize side effects. Yet long term side effects such as motor neuron defect and Bradykinesia, Dyskinesia etc occur.
  • Cell Replacement Therapy is the Only Approach that Promises Functional Reversal of Parkinson’s Disease.

METHODS:

  • AllExcel, Inc. has Developed a Platform Technology for Developing Designed, Functionally Improved Cell Lines without the use of viral vectors or DNA manipulation.
  • Technology is based on concepts derived from naturally observed Human Cell-Cell Interactions (CCITM).

RESULTS:

Fast growing potent Dopaminergic cell lines have been produced with long survival in cell culture. In animal studies (6-OHDA treated Rat model for PD), 4 different clones showed very effective reversal of the disease.

CONCLUSIONS:

Highly potent modified neural cells have been produced in our lab to treat PD patients.

 

  • Neuropsychiatric Disorders
Biography:

Surya Pratap Singh is currently working as a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry in Banaras Hindu University. He has done his Post-doctoral training from 2000 to 2008 in University of Illinois at Chicago and Johns Hopkins, USA and in 1995-1996 in National Institute of Neuroscience, Tokyo, Japan. He has received his PhD, MSc and BSc in Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, India.

 

Abstract:

Parkinson’s disease, an age related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta of the mid brain and projecting neurons in striatum. Recently, several studies regarding parkinson’s disease have proven the role of oxidative stress in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. In this context, our study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of Tinospora Cordifolia Aqueous Extract (TCAE) in parkinsonian mice. From the immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, it is evident that TCAE inhibits the MPTP-induced activation of NF-κB and its associated pro-inflammatory cytokines. Through, Real time PCR analysis it was revealed that pro-inflammatory cytokines were found to be up regulated in MPTP intoxicated mice while TCAE treatment significantly restored their levels. In addition, the expression level of IL-10 was found decreased in diseased condition which was further restored by TCAE treatment. Tyrosine hydroxylase, an important enzyme which is used as marker in parkinson’s disease, its expression was found to be reduced in MPTP mice while on giving TCAE, its level was significantly restored. Our result clearly indicates that Tinospora cordifolia provides neuroprotection against MPTP induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and shows potent anti-inflammatory activity.

 

Biography:

Surya Pratap Singh is currently working as a Professor in the Department of Biochemistry in Banaras Hindu University. He has done his Post-doctoral training from 2000 to 2008 in University of Illinois at Chicago and Johns Hopkins, USA and in 1995-1996 in National Institute of Neuroscience, Tokyo, Japan. He has received his PhD, MSc and BSc in Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, India.

 

Abstract:

Parkinson’s disease, an age related neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta of the mid brain and projecting neurons in striatum. Recently, several studies regarding parkinson’s disease have proven the role of oxidative stress in neurodegeneration and neuroinflammation. In this context, our study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of Tinospora Cordifolia Aqueous Extract (TCAE) in parkinsonian mice. From the immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis, it is evident that TCAE inhibits the MPTP-induced activation of NF-κB and its associated pro-inflammatory cytokines. Through, Real time PCR analysis it was revealed that pro-inflammatory cytokines were found to be up regulated in MPTP intoxicated mice while TCAE treatment significantly restored their levels. In addition, the expression level of IL-10 was found decreased in diseased condition which was further restored by TCAE treatment. Tyrosine hydroxylase, an important enzyme which is used as marker in parkinson’s disease, its expression was found to be reduced in MPTP mice while on giving TCAE, its level was significantly restored. Our result clearly indicates that Tinospora cordifolia provides neuroprotection against MPTP induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurodegeneration and shows potent anti-inflammatory activity

 

  • Movement Disorders
Biography:

Subhas Bhuin has completed his  MBBS , MD General Medicine , and pursuing DM Neuromedicine from  BANGUR INSTITUTE OF NEUROSCIENCES , IPGMER , KOLKATA, INDIA.

Abstract:

Introduction - Clinical  profile and severity correlation  of ataxia patients in our population is still  varied . This study is taken up to explore this aspect. 

Methods - A cross-sectional study  was conducted at XXX. Clinical parameters with  severity correlation( SARA scale )  in selected patients  was determined. 

Results: In 188 patients  , 127  had cerebellar ataxia(SCA 2, 3, 1 ,6 ,12  , MSA C , Wilsons disease) , 42  had sensory ataxia  mainly  Sensory ataxic  GBS, CIDP  variant(CISP) , Sjogrens  and 19 had  Mixed cerebellar sensory ataxia (Multiple sclerosis , Vitamin E deficiency  ). Cerebellar ataxias had  higher  disability at presentation (  mean SARA score- 21.87)  than mixed ataxias ( SARA – 19.68). Increase in SARA score was seen more in mixed ataxias  (3.64)  than  cerebellar  ( 3.01) . Disability progression   is more in MSA C and SCA 2 has lesser degree of progression  ( despite  highest SARA score- 28.5  at presentation).

Conclusion -    MSA C,   SCA ,  Multiple sclerosis  are  majority in  respective ataxia groups..  Maximum disability and  progression is seen in MSA and SCA (SARA scale) . Chances of  early detection and knowledge about progression of ataxia spectrum in our population is attempted.

Limitations :  Further follow up of the patients with ataxia required to get a clear insight

Further Scope :  Early diagnosis and management strategies can be validated for better management and prevention of deterioration to make the otherwise debilitating  ataxia disorders a preventable  one.

Conflict of interest- Nil

Keywords: Ataxia,  Cerebellar , SARA Scale

 

  • Managing life with Parkinsons Disease

Session Introduction

Iwona Sienko

University of British Columbia Okanagan Campus, Canada

Title: The need for diseases
Biography:

Iwona Sienko has over 30 years of nursing and leadership experience in working in various healthcare systems and own business. Throughout her career, she developed a deep trust in a human capacity that became even more prevalent after spending time healing from chronic stress. During that time she explored the latest discoveries in neuroscience, epigenetics, and neuroplasticity. She has learned how to build resiliency in the body and mind. In a way, she bio hacked her life to overcome the adversities of her experiences. She witnessed first-hand how the body and mind can heal from chronic stress when given proper support in the right environment. She is an Adjunct Professor with the School of Nursing at UBCO; in her practice, she utilizes the power of mindfulness and its influence on our relationship with stress. She holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing and Masters in Business Administration and is a certified smartUBC facilitator.

 

Abstract:

Stress is a natural part of our lives and healthy levels help us with creativity, reaching our goals and maintaining overall drive. Increased stress levels erode our health, productivity and overall happiness. Chronic stress is becoming an epidemic of the twenty-first century. To combat this state of affairs many began exploring the benefits of mindfulness as an antidote to chronic stress. Thirty years of research looking at the effects of mindfulness, as well as the neuroscience of mindfulness, offer compelling evidence to support the use of mindfulness practices. Some benefits of practicing mindfulness are stronger focus, better memory, staying calmer under stress, enhanced concentration and executive functioning, improved overall mental and physical health. In 2015, the School of Nursing at UBC Okanagan began offering a smartUBC to all first-year students in a mandatory Relational Practice course. The rationale was two-fold: to provide undergraduate students with mindfulness skills and capacities to help them navigate and succeed in their first year of university as well as stress management and resiliency techniques for their nursing practice. These students are currently part of a 6-year longitudinal study looking at the efficacy of smartUBC. First-year findings provide preliminary evidence that the smartUBC course offers coping techniques to nursing students to assist them with the demands of school. We offered smartUBC to our faculty and staff and have expanded the program into the community. Program evaluation into these sessions reports that the curriculum has a positive impact on both work and personal lives. The vast majority of participants would recommend the course to others and faculty members believe there is a benefit to offering smartUBC in the academic environment. The smartUBC (stress management and resiliency techniques) curriculum has its foundation in MBSR (mindfulness-based stress reduction) with added components of emotional theory and forgiveness and compassion training.

 

  • Mental Health

Session Introduction

Sailaxmi Gandhi

National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, India

Title: Challenges initiating & supporting vocational training for persons suffering mental illness in India
Biography:

Dr Sailaxmi Gandhi is an Additional Professor & Head, Department of Nursing at NIMHANS (National Institute of Mental Health & Neurosciences) which is an INI (Institute of National Importance) at Bengaluru, India. She has 32 yrs. Of service in nursing and is the recipient of the prestigious President’s award of the Best Nursing Teacher in 2014 bestowed in the Rashtrapathi Bhavan, New Delhi on International Nurses Day as well as various other awards such as the Dr Radha Krishnan Gold Medal Award for ‘Excellence in individual achievements & National Development, by Global Economic Progress & Research Association in 2012. She is a PhD and post-graduate guide and a nursing consultant in the psychiatric rehabilitation services as well as the adult psychiatry unit V. She has published many articles in PubMed and other indexed journals as well as books, the most recent being a book on ‘ADL for Persons with Mental Illness: A Book for Caregivers’. Her areas of interest are occupational stress and stress management programs, school mental health, psychiatric rehabilitation, holistic well-being, suicide prevention and maternal and infant mental health.

 

Abstract:

The National Mental Health Survey (2014-2016), one of the largest mental health “Research and Action” oriented study undertaken in recent times across 12 states of India reported a high weighted lifetime prevalence of 5.25 in depressive disorders and 1.41 in severe mental illness (n=34802). The WHO also states that by the year 2020, Depression will be the most prevalent condition in the world. With this high rise in NCDs (Non-communicable diseases), a large proportion of people with mental illness also have co-existing medical conditions such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, etc. adding the disability. In this background, there exists a high level of stigma towards this illness. Individuals with mental illness recover better with lesser relapse rates when they are engaged in work. Symptoms, medications side effects and other skills deficits such as cognitive/social/assertive/communication skills can interfere with getting and maintaining a job. At a premier mental health institute in South India, a nurse-led initiative in a multi-disciplinary team (MDT) faced several challenges in initiating and maintaining a vocation training café named as the ROSes Café (Recovery Oriented Services). A caregiver who trained persons with mental illness (supervised by the MDT) in various stages commencing with cleaning vegetables, dishes, etc. and going up to account management operated the café. Interested persons with mental illness were invited to be part of this venture. Initial grading was done based on their competencies. Behavioral strategies such as re-enforcement were used as part of the training process. Challenged faced were many ranging from getting space, an instructor, administrative support, funding, etc. The onus was the instructor’s (caregiver) and the team’s satisfaction, placement of the recovering individuals and increasing popularity of this venture.

 

Biography:

Nadia Mohamed Ahmed Mohamed is currently working as a Professor in the field of Medical biochemistry. He has completed his Graduation from Ain Shams University with Bachelors of Science in Biochemistry.

 

Abstract:

Drug-induced kidney injury is the causative of acute kidney failure. Amifostine loaded silica nanoemulsion was synthesized using water/oil emulsion with the help of ultra-sonication waves. The nanoemulsion was prepared using Tetraethyl Orthosilicate [TEOS], Cetyltrimethylammonium Bromide [CTAB], Castor Oil [CAO] and Amifostine [AMF] as a source for silica, surfactant, extra stabilizing agent and a model drug respectively. The as synthesized nanoemulsion of silica and silica loaded with amifostine [[email protected]] was examined via Transmission Electron Microscopy [TEM] and Dynamic Light Scattering [DLS] in terms of particles shape and hydrodynamic average size. The study was extended to investigate the protective role of this nanoemulsion model as cytoprotective drug effect against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in male albino rats. It was clearly seen that the successful preparation of the as-synthesized silica nanoemulsion loaded with amifostine [[email protected]] but the particle size was marginally increased when comparing with silica nanoemulsion. Additionally, Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN), Serum Creatinine (SC) and Urinary Total Protein (UTP) were increased and the level of Creatinine Clearance (Crcl) was decreased. All those were met with disorders in oxidative stress and down regulation in expression of nephrin gene. Also, histopathologic changes of the kidney tissue were observed. These changes back to normal by treatment with silica nanoparticles loaded amifostine [[email protected]]. Oil/water nanoemulsion of [[email protected]] showed a protective and promising preventive strategy against nephrotoxicity due to their cytoprotective and antioxidant effects.

 

Biography:

Irad Eichler founded “Shekulo Tov Group” in 2005. Shekulo Tov Group is a non-profit organization for vocational recovery. Shekulo Tov Group developed the Integrative Model and was awarded the “Project Zero” prize for impactful social enterprises in 2017, categorized under Innovative Practice 2017 on Employment, Work and Vocational Education & Training. He is also the Founder of “7 Chairs”, a platform for text support groups and the Founder of “Israeli Social Business School” and a Podcaster. He was announced by the world economic forum as a Social Entrepreneur of the Year 2008.

 

Abstract:

Research shows that the extent of employment mobility among people with psychiatric disabilities is low, even though most of them want and can work. While supported employment has significantly improved competitive work outcomes throughout the world, it leads to sustained work in only 25-35% of persons with psychiatric disabilities, while most persons lose jobs within a few weeks/months after beginning them or never obtain competitive work. Shekulo Tov is a non-profit organization and a service supplier for the Israeli Ministry of Health for more than 3,000 service users. Shekulo Tov’s Integrative Unit Model represents an essential change of perception vis-à-vis vocational rehabilitation. It is a formative shift from the two sequential approaches of “train, then place” or “place then train” to a simultaneous approach of “train & place". The model’s development led to the formation of the Shekulo Tov Group which operates a number of businesses and organizations as “integrative units” based in the community, who all embedded the model. Among Shekulo Tov Group businesses: Rebooks (second-hand bookshops), Good Coffee (cafes), and God Dog (dogwalkers). The Integrative Unit Model successfully transitioned more than 25% of service users from vocational rehabilitation to open labor market placements. The Model has reduced service users’ preparative vocational training for open labor market placement from four years to 20 months. Job applicants are offered vocational rehabilitation, skills and career development, training programs and necessary preparation and support to measure their vocational progress.

 

Biography:

Dr. Puneet Kathuria has been blessed to serve humanity in the developing world, has been treating patients since 2006 as a practising Consultant Psychiatrist. Ha has held various positions in the Indian Psychiatric Society as well as the Indian Association of Private Psychiatry (IAPP). He is currently the National Chairperson of the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Committee of IAPP. He also runs a foundation of his own called the Elpis Welfare Society, working for the cause of mental health. He runs half marathons to keep him fit. He currently is the Director of Prem Neuropsychiatry Centre, K K Hospital and The Global Child Wellness Centre based at Ludhiana, Punjab, India.

 

Abstract:

Mental health is among the most vexing social and medical problems of our era. Medications are effective, though access, costs, stigma, side effects, and health risks may deter utilization. Likewise, professional psychotherapy helps yet is unaffordable and unavailable to many and, even when empirically based treatments can be accessed, relapse, mortality, and morbidity are the rule with mental disorders. Therefore, there is an urgent need for affordable and accessible treatment options. We all are baffled by the thought that the processes of non-pharmacological interventions that is so successful in the western, just does not find any takers in the eastern world. Despite so much evidence in favor of the number of therapies and techniques, still, these continue to be on the fringes of the eastern mental health treatment. Alternative or complementary medical and spiritual approaches are promising and are associated with excellent patient acceptance. There appears to be an upward trend toward acceptance and utilization of these ‘complementary’ practices. Evidence suggests that meditation practice is associated with neuro-plastic changes in various regions of the brain such as the anterior cingulate cortex, insula, and temporoparietal junction. Studies on long-term meditators suggest structural changes in the form of pre-frontal differences as well as insular differences in the form of increased grey matter. (Holzel et al., 2008; Luders, Toga, Lepore, and Gaser, 2009). We want to create a model of assimilation wherein the eastern practices are incorporated in such a way that the whole model is more acceptable to the developing world. We address the spiritual practices viz. Yoga and meditation as an alternative or complementary form of mind-body medicine.

 

Biography:

Mahnaz Mehrabizadeh Honarmand is currently working as a faculty at Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran.

 

Abstract:

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral stress management intervention on general health and quality of life in patients with cardiovascular diseases in Ahvaz. The available samples were used for selecting the subjects so that 30 individuals from the cardiovascular patients were selected to participate in the survey and were divided randomly into two groups, experimental and control every 15 persons. All the participants answered the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Brief Questionnaire (Who-QOL-BRIEF). The experimental group received 10 sessions of stress management training by the cognitive- behavioral method. At the posttest stage, the responses of both groups to the questionnaires were recorded again. The data was analyzed using MANCOA. The results showed that cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention had a positive significant effect on the general health and the quality of life of the treatment group. The findings show that cognitive-behavioral stress management intervention can be effective as a selective psychotherapy method and also as a supplement in the medical treatment of the cardiovascular patients.

 

  • Dementia
Biography:

Jessica Guo is currently a sophomore at Ward Melville High School. She has completed a 6 week summer internship at the Weill Cornell Medical College, and is currently a student researcher at the SUNY Old Westbury Neuroscience Research Institute. She is mentored by Professor Wei Zhu, who received his Ph.D. from the Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, and completed his Post- Doctoral fellowship at the Mind Body Medical Institute at Harvard University

Abstract:

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) is the second most common form of dementia and currently affects over 10 million people. Parkinson’s is a neurodegenerative disease that results in significant loss of cholinergic neurons. Symptoms include tremors, Bradykinesia (slowed movement), rigid muscles, impaired posture/balance, loss of automatic/unconscious movements, speech changes, and writing changes.

Rotenone is an odorless, colorless, crystalline isoflavone used as a broad-spectrum insecticide. By inhibiting the mitochondrial complex I, ROS (Reactive oxidative stress) levels substantially increase in the cells, and the number of dead cells is remarkably higher. As a result of this deficiency in complex I in the mitochondria, an increase in ROS and the reduction of energy stores ensues, eventually contributing to neurodegeneration of cholinergic neurons. Through this process, rotenone triggers morphological changes in cells. Rotenone is a naturally occurring insecticide that is used worldwide because it has broad pesticidal properties. Due to the widespread use of rotenone, the reversal of this neurotoxicity is the current need for Parkinson’s Disease patients. Because there is evidence that antioxidants Glutathione, Piperlongumine, and Piperlonguminine protect the mitochondrial complex I, this study focuses on the protective effects of these respective chemicals on Parkinson’s neuronal cells exposed to rotenone.